CPAWS welcomes next step in protecting Nahanni watershed

Ottawa – CPAWS welcomes today’s announcement by Environment Minister John Baird that lands comprising the headwaters of the Nahanni River in the Northwest Territories have been temporarily protected to enable the creation of a new national park, to be called Nááts’ihch’oh [pronounced naah-tseen-CHO].

Arctic Youth Network

The Arctic Youth Network is a grassroots organization that works to connect young Northerners to the opportunities around them, to their communities, and to the policies that affect their daily lives.

YCS asks you to Take Action

The Yukon Conservation Society (YCS) educates, advocates and conducts research on Yukon environmental issues, and has been doing so since 1968.

Yukon bison population over target, survey shows

The Yukon bison population is booming, a government survey shows. The Yukon government set a target population limit at 500 animals, but last week 641 examples of North America’s largest land mammal were counted.

Frozen Gas: A Coalbed Methane Primer

Coalbed methane exploration and development are being proposed for the Yukon. But it is not here yet. We still have time to decide whether we want it and, if so, how the industry should operate.

Gwitchin once more into the breach for ANWR

Gwitchin leaders from the Yukon are packing their bags for yet another trip to Washington to fight against proposals to drill for oil in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

Yukon Equipment – Green Business Success Story

Image via Wikipedia For more than fifty years, Yukon Equipment has been selling and leasing construction equipment in Alaska. The company also has been implementing an array of waste reduction activities, including recycling, reusing, purchasing environmentally preferable products, reducing toxics, and decreasing energy use. When Yukon first joined Green Star, it was able to boast…

Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative

Combining science and stewardship, we seek to ensure that the world- renowned wilderness, wildlife, native plants, and natural processes of the Yellowstone to Yukon region continue to function as an interconnected web of life, capable of supporting all of the natural and human communities that reside within it, for now and for future generations.